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Proud of sister Susan

An article from my Google Alert for "chief manheimer": San Mateo residents weigh in on police chief recruitment, as they're looking for candidates to fill the position of Police Chief from which my sister, Sue, is retiring.

I'm not privy to the inside situation, can't tell whether or not there are undercurrents of internal and interpersonal politics, but it seems like these people are saying - not so overtly, but not so subtly - that we want what she was doing. People in roles that probably don't require saying nice things, in a situation where it's not about saying nice things about the person who's leaving.
Chairez hoped the department’s next leader would follow in Manheimer’s footsteps in understanding San Mateo’s diversity and establishing trust with all community members.
[...]
Harker said he met Manheimer at a Service Academy session some five years ago, and was impressed with her nuanced understanding and approach to complex issues like human trafficking. [...] “That built a lot of trust in the community and that’s what I like to see in community policing,” he said.
 [...]
Corbett expressed gratitude to those who offered feedback, and noted their input helped crystallize for him the merits of Manheimer’s belief in investing in the community early and building trust in the community, which he said he would be looking for in candidates to fill the role.
 [...]
[City Manager] Corbett acknowledged Manheimer’s many accomplishments as the leader of the city department that engages the most with the community, which he said magnified the importance of hearing from community members about what they would like to see.
As I've watched from the margins over time, some of these are the things I have been pleased to tell people, "my sister does this and that". Nice to see that affirmed, even if in a kind of muted, "this is going to be hard to match..." way.

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