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Finger Lakes 2019-06 Biking: Wednesday, June 5 - small incident, no biking

This is posting #3 of a camping and bicycling trip I took with some friends through the Finger Lakes region of upper-state New York. Here's the complete set of postings:
  1. Finger Lakes 2019-06 Biking: Overview and preliminary travel, Sunday, Monday June 2, 3
  2. Finger Lakes 2019-06 Biking: Tuesday, June 4
  3. Finger Lakes 2019-06 Biking: Wednesday, June 5 - small incident, no biking  ⇐ You are here
  4. Finger Lakes 2019-06 Biking: Thursday, June 6
  5. Finger Lakes 2019-06 Biking: Friday, June 7 - campsite transition, no biking
  6. Finger Lakes 2019-06 Biking: Saturday, June 8
  7. Finger Lakes 2019-06 Biking: Sunday, June 9
  8. Finger Lakes 2019-06 Biking: Trip Wrap-Up
I took a recuperation day off from biking on Wednesday. I also needed to stop in town (to get a toilet plunger for the single bathroom in the lake house where we were staying), and also got a bag each of dried apricots and and dried dates, to try as part of the "fueling" experiment.

To return to Watkins Glen State Park (where we set up my tent two days before), Ash and I drove our respective cars around the far side of Keuka Lake. We aimed to to see the sights along the way. I was looking forward to visiting the Glen H. Curtis Museum, near the southern end of the lake, but wound up being sidetracked, by accidentally lodging my car in a drainage ditch at the far edge of the road shoulder.

I had pulled over to the shoulder after some unusual roads and just beyond a downhill blind curve, to wait for Ash. I didn't see the overgrown deep drainage ditch right at the edge of the shoulder, and a slight, continuing rain plus some mud meant my car had insufficient traction to get out. Fortunately, my Geico insurance covers such mishaps (and their app makes it easy - yay, Geico!), and within a few hours I was back on my way. (The towing company took a long time to show, twice because the truck they sent the first time was the wrong one for the task. So it took a while, but at no monetary cost to me.) A little reminder that surprises abound, plans change...

Previous: Finger Lakes 2019-06 Biking: Tuesday, June 4

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